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9 Indicators of Workforce Success

The modern workplace is in a state of constant change. Successfully managing this perpetual motion is a challenge. What is becoming evident is that to do so requires giving talent management the same level of attention as operations, finance, and strategy. […]

9 Indicators of Workforce Success

The modern workplace is in a state of constant change. Successfully managing this perpetual motion is a challenge. What is becoming evident is that to do so requires giving talent management the same level of attention as operations, finance, and strategy.

Leveraging talent management to achieve better business outcomes

To win, organisations must integrate learning and talent management. If you can align with business goals, increase communication, and share these priorities across these three functions, you will enable employees and organisations to achieve strategic results.

How do you know if this collaboration is achieving the result you want? Easy. Here are nine key indicators that companies can use to establish where they are now and how to reach higher levels of excellence.

1. A people-centric culture

A “people-centric” culture plays a fundamental role in getting the best out of employees and can impact employee tenure. Easy to overlook, culture determines both the way employees interact with one another and how well the organisation functions collectively. Enterprises that foster a healthy culture recognise it directly correlates to employee engagement, satisfaction, and productivity. Plus, employees today often seek out employers for their culture, ahead of pay and benefits packages.

2. HR plays a critical role in the company’s people strategy

Many HR departments struggle to connect with their employee base fully. Often, they are left feeling like they’re pushing boulders uphill to encourage participation in HR programs.

To redress this attitude, organisations must analyse the employee lifecycle and address each member of their workforce as a unique individual. If possible, utilise the Chief People Officer (CHRO) to position the learning and talent functions and promote them as critical contributors to the company’s success.

3. Curation strategy aligns with organisational needs

Learning and development (L&D) is shifting from internal programs aimed at training people to innovative environments that encourage employees to develop themselves. In more advanced organisations, employees are motivated to take active and proactive roles in their professional development. In some instances, organisations are even allowing employees, not just subject matter experts, to contribute to the development of learning content.

4. A sharp focus on the user experience

Today’s users expect more from HR, learning and development, and the user experience (UX) they deliver. Ideally, cutting-edge, state-of-the-art design principles should equate to next-generation, consumer-grade learning experiences that are simple, effective, and enjoyable. HR and L&D must explore and implement learning technologies that compel employees to explore more of their capabilities. What sort of technologies? Ones that improve decision making, save time through automation, reduce the potential for errors, and deliver personalised value to each employee. The use of robust employee profiles is essential to driving personalisation and relevance to the platform experience.

5. An advanced technology infrastructure

When an organisation interweaves rich employee profiles with intelligent learning and talent management software, the results are extraordinary. High performing organisations, i.e., those that are getting results, use their learning platforms to exploit the advantage big data algorithms provide. They build out ‘smart systems’ that get more intuitive over time. HR and L&D can then leverage insights into workforce capacity, and capability to maintain organisational agility. This ability is crucial as it facilitates adaptation to changing industry dynamics, regulatory laws, and information technology standards.

6. Elective participation

An organisation can gauge the level of support for its talent and learning strategy by the degree of elective participation it receives from learners. Ideally, organisations will benefit from advocates who turn toward the HR experience to continue to grow capabilities and cultivate careers. There is more employee “pull” because the value of HR programs and applications is contextual and accessible in the employee’s moments of need. More mature organisations also leverage engagement tactics fuelled by big data to encourage more voluntary participation.

7. Solid governance

HR’s ability to instil authority is a clear sign of its maturity level. At an earlier stage of maturity, it is common for organisations to establish steering committees of key stakeholders from across the business, which eventually transitions into formal command structures. In fully mature organisations, the oversight for learning and talent management jurisdiction is clear and intuitive. These organisations also operate from a fact base of data to optimise efficiency and continually enhance their effectiveness.

8. Getting funding is painless

As an organisation’s funding strategy improves, it becomes easier to work collaboratively with those in charge of procurement and other stakeholders. More evolved companies recognise talent as a critical investment that directly influences the organisation’s strategic success. Therefore, at the higher levels of maturity, investment in learning and development programs often exceeds industry benchmarks.

9. Higher utilisation of reporting and measurement

Data is everything. Data-driven decisions are now more prevalent everywhere, and HR is no exception. As organisations transform beyond traditional HR practices, it makes sense to define a clear and comprehensive measurement strategy for all L&D programs and initiatives. Be sure to stress the importance of making the business impact a key performance indicator of success.

 

Why the Amazon Learning Strategy Makes Perfect Business Sense

The news that Amazon plans to spend over $700 million to offer training to 100,000 workers made global headlines. In today’s historically tight labor market, this talent strategy makes perfect sense.  Not only will Amazon position itself as an employer who offers opportunities for professional development, but it will also build a workforce of highly skilled talent. […]

Why the Amazon Learning Strategy Makes Perfect Business Sense

The news that Amazon plans to spend over $700 million to offer training to 100,000 workers made global headlines. In today’s historically tight labor market, this talent strategy makes perfect sense.  Not only will Amazon position itself as an employer who offers opportunities for professional development, but it will also build a workforce of highly skilled talent.

I regularly speak of the current “HR Perfect Storm,” and Amazon’s approach of combining learning and talent processes is akin to battening down the hatches. By interweaving these processes, organizations stand a better chance of weathering the storm. The good news is that developing an essential learning and talent strategy to combat this market storm is not difficult.

For starters, here are three easy steps that will help HR establish a basic framework for a learning and talent strategy.

1. Assess

It is easy to fall into the trap of assuming that everyone in an organization is on the same page. In my experience, this is rarely the case. To redress this disconnect, begin by examining the factors that influence the way employees view the company learning programs. It is critical to know where everyone stands to understand how best to move forward. Leverage a Survey Monkey questionnaire or similar tool to assess your team or stakeholders. Within the poll, make sure to have a narrow scope and use standard terms for clarity. I find that tenure and individual roles within the organization contribute to varying perspectives when assessed.

2. Align

The next step is the most important. Recently I had the pleasure of helping several leading organizations align their talent and learning strategy. What I learned from these experiences is that companies must take special care to define the parameters of common terms for any talent development plan. Start by reusing the survey/questionnaire but in a group setting where respondents can only submit one answer. Listen carefully as the dialogue during this time is gold and generates highly valuable insight to begin the process of alignment. Once the team can honestly assess their current state, calibration starts.

3. Execute

After the alignment exercise, it’s time to determine how best to proceed. Utilize the alignment discussions to identify one or two themes to focus your efforts. Look for areas that will establish a solid footing for your strategy, not necessarily the most visible or exciting. Don’t try to change everything all at once. Two areas that I see as the most fundamental and most significant indicators of success are governance and change management.

I also encourage organizations to leverage the Skillsoft Organizational Maturity Index. This framework offers a practical methodology for aligning learning, talent, and workforce management. It is an invaluable framework designed to assist the HR function pivot in the right direction to drive tangible business impact. By utilizing the maturity index, an organization can assess their progress and understand the milestones that demonstrate advancement to the next stage. Skillsoft provides a complimentary online assessment that diagnoses a company’s present stage and offers a playbook of recommendations to ascend to the next phase.

The key takeaway is that the intent for aligning your learning and talent strategies is to be deliberate in your outcomes. Organizations in 2019 cannot afford to be “coincidental” in their learning and talent strategies.

For more HR and talent development insight, please check out my weekly deliberations on my web site: www.brentcolescott.com.

Let HR Drive Agility in Your Workforce

In the last 15 years, almost a third of corporations on the Dow Jones Industrial Average were replaced. Failure to adapt was one of the critical contributing factors to their demise. The frenetic pace of change is a massive concern for all enterprises, and how your organization handles this challenge will determine whether or not your business is sustainable. […]

Let HR Drive Agility in Your Workforce

In the last 15 years, almost a third of corporations on the Dow Jones Industrial Average were replaced. Failure to adapt was one of the critical contributing factors to their demise. The frenetic pace of change is a massive concern for all enterprises, and how your organization handles this challenge will determine whether or not your business is sustainable.

Central to any organization’s business sustainability is implementing a talent strategy that enables growth in an ever-shifting workplace environment. Business leaders already know that many former industry giants are failing in this rapidly changing marketplace. The key to reducing vulnerability and becoming “fail-proof” is through retention and maximization of talent.

In other words, HR’s fundamental role is now critically aligned with business strategy. A recent Market Cap survey of 1,600 global organizations found that the percent of C-Suite members who discuss talent management related strategy and issues with investors has increased to nearly 70%.

Simply recognizing HR’s critical role is not sufficient. HR must be allowed to build a culture where individuals are trained and ready to tackle change. One that empowers employees to take ownership of their development so they can acquire new skills sets. It also needs to provide employees with limitless career opportunities.

HR must be allowed to:

#1 Make talent a top priority

Leading organizations focused on business sustainability must hire the right talent with an intuitive and customizable requisition process; screening, interview and application tools; and the ability to search and manage pools of external and internal employee candidates. It’s not about “headcount,” it’s about the right heads, sitting in the right chairs. As any experienced HR leader knows, that requires tremendous organization and a frictionless recruitment process.

#2 Promote from within 

We know it is less expensive to upskill an existing employee than to find someone new, and employees are making it clear that they want employers who offer career opportunities. Watch Derek Blake, Sr. Director of Global Learning at PSAV, explain how they are deploying career functionality to plan their future workforce.

#3 Develop the skills your organization really needs 

Before embarking on any learning initiative, it is essential first to understand the skills needed both now and the skills required to take your organization into the future. Complete an inventory of the scope of the skills your employees currently possess – this includes those skills they have but do not utilize in their current capacity – and share the findings with the key stakeholders to develop an accurate picture of the necessary skills.

No one understands people like HR

Morné Swart, Vice President of Global Product Strategy & Transformational Leader, SumTotal, recently published Why Leading Organizations Need HR to Drive Business Sustainability. This free eBook provides a game plan to:

  • Position HR at the helm of business sustainability by being an expert in the boardroom
  • Explain why digital transformation has changed talent management and what it means for your organization long-term
  • Gain more in-depth knowledge of why innovation, automation, and adaptation are the keys to a robust talent management and business sustainability strategy
  • Make talent development the top priority for decision-makers within your organization
  • Empower your people to take control of their careers and fully engage with their roles

Is Your Organization Worried about the Falling Unemployment Rate?

The current US unemployment rate is at a historic low. Which, although in the main is excellent news, it does present significant challenges for employers as they scramble and compete with each other for the same ever-dwindling pool of talent. […]

Is Your Organization Worried about the Falling Unemployment Rate?

The current US unemployment rate is at a historic low. Which, although in the main is excellent news, it does present significant challenges for employers as they scramble and compete with each other for the same ever-dwindling pool of talent.

Recently I contributed to TalentCulture’s #WorkTrends podcast + Twitter chat hosted by Meghan M. Biro to talk about this very subject and offered her listeners advice about how learning and development can fix this problem. It’s a topic that is very close to my heart and one I encounter on an almost daily basis as I travel around the globe in my capacity as Senior Director of Business Strategy and Transformation at SumTotal.

Why L&D is the answer to the talent shortage question

The bottom line is organizations must prioritize learning and development to retain current talent and attract new talent. This emphasis on education is not a new solution; many companies have a tradition of investing in their people. What is new is that such investment is no longer an optional, “nice to have” benefit to working at your company. No, in today’s tight labor market, it is essential that enterprises have systemic, structured career development. I think soon we will see within an organization clear and structured career pathways similar to the current mapping app must of us have on our phones.

A new emphasis on the employee experience

Another consequence of this new employee-driven labor market is a renewed or shift in focus on the employee. If this is not happening within your organization this year, you may find it tougher than ever to recruit and retain workers in the future. I’ve already seen several advertisements for an SVP of People Experience, a role that simply did not exist before and reinforces the emphasis and value employers are placing on their employees.

What can organizations do to meet employee expectations?

For starters, employers need to accept that learning is more than setting up a catalog within an LMS; developing talent is more than ensuring annual performance reviews take place; and managing the workforce is more than a series of time allocation activities/making sure your employees clock in on time. These functions must work together in, ideally, perfect harmony.

Skillsoft researched over 6,700 organizations and 45 million employees in 160 countries to gather real-world data upon which to design a blueprint for companies to use when bringing the siloed areas of learning, talent and workforce management together to prepare for this new employee-centric future. The Skillsoft Organizational Maturity Index is a practical guide that assists companies in aligning their infrastructure and provides concrete stepping stones to reach higher levels of excellence. By utilizing the maturity index, an organization can assess their progress and understand the milestones that demonstrate advancement to the next stage. Skillsoft provides a complimentary online assessment that diagnoses a company’s present stage and offers a playbook of recommendations to ascend to the next phase.

The 5 stages of growth

Achieving the results of a mature learning strategy is a journey. Benchmarking, both formally and informally, helps identify the methods and actions that will make a difference. Through research and hands-on experience, Skillsoft has identified five stages of growth:

Stage 1: Disparate learning, talent, and workforce functions; culture is hierarchical and unengaging.

Stage 2: Initial coordination between learning, talent, and workforce functions; burgeoning executive interest in employee engagement and culture.

Stage 3: Learning, talent, and workforce functions merge; culture is very people-centric.

Stage 4: HR is a core strategic decision maker; engaging, agile organizational culture

Stage 5: Self-developing ecosystem; a highly sought-after culture.

Measuring success and growth

Skillsoft has nine indicators they use to measure success around these five stages. What is interesting to note is that so far, most of the companies assessed are at stage two. In a way, it’s like the idea is beginning to catch on, leadership is starting to make the connection and the relevance of this connection, between the areas. Once this occurs, the shift to stage three happens at a faster pace.

 

The time for reskilling is now

Here’s a question to ask yourself – if an employee at your company was learning a new skill and had some professional development happening onscreen, would they feel the need to hide the learning if someone from leadership or HR passed by? If the answer is yes, then perhaps it’s time to re-examine your company’s culture. HR needs to link training and performance. Employees are hungry for learning and development. It is your responsibility to ensure each person sees the potential and path for progression. Otherwise, you risk them leaving your organization for new career opportunities. The idea of L&D as something for after-hours is obsolete.

Other changes the future will bring

  • HR data will get better: HR will finally get the data they are looking for to do their job thoroughly.
  • Employees are like a sports team: We will begin treating employees as team players and move people around to where they are needed the most.
  • The human factor: Despite the automation of many tasks and functions, at the end of the day, humans still serve a purpose. However, this will also include new skills, so again it as about preparation and training.

 

Make sure to join me on my next TalentCulture #WorkTrends podcast, September 13th at 1:30 p.m. EST, where I will be talking about my latest white paper: Putting the Human Back in HR. The podcast will be followed by a #WorkTrends Twitter chat Wednesday, September 18th.

Read the Latest Insights on Talent Management and People Development in Practice

Most of us are familiar with the idea of a Catch-22.  While it originally referred to a military rule in Joseph Keller’s 1961 masterpiece of the same name, we now use it to apply to any time you are caught in a frustrating situation, trapped by contradictory regulations or conditions. […]

Read the Latest Insights on Talent Management and People Development in Practice

Most of us are familiar with the idea of a Catch-22.  While it originally referred to a military rule in Joseph Keller’s 1961 masterpiece of the same name, we now use it to apply to any time you are caught in a frustrating situation, trapped by contradictory regulations or conditions. I think most of us can cite numerous examples of Catch-22 scenarios in the workplace, but recently more data has come to light to suggest HR and talent management, in particular, is currently plagued by a very troubling Catch-22.

Together with the Fosway Group, SumTotal recently completed extensive research into what’s working in talent management today and what isn’t. The work builds on a previous collaboration between our organizations, Transforming Talent in the Modern Workforce, which looked at how the workplace is transforming and the impact technology is having on this new order. This time we wanted to take a closer look at what’s happening in workplaces and HR teams across EMEA.

The results from the study highlight some common trends that stem from the fact that work is changing so the way organisations attract and retain new talent needs to change. However, while we can all agree on this impact, the question we asked is are HR departments meeting this expectation in the real world?

Not quite. Only 4% of enterprises have fully completed the digital transformation of their people functions. The majority (62%) are still in the process and therefore, yet to fully realise the full effects of digital transformation. In other words, most are still missing out on the potential of HR moving from being a “translator” of people processes (absence management, payroll and recruiting) into a strategic influencer and enabler for organisational success.

Crisis in innovation in HR

Almost 70% of those we surveyed believe their HR systems are not fit for the modern workforce. That’s an alarming figure given that everyone in the profession acknowledges that HR systems need to align with the expectations of both the employee and the business.  Only 9% think their tech is fully ready to meet employee expectations. I was surprised to learn that 33% are still using spreadsheets to execute their daily HR processes, and 14% are using nothing at all.

If you were to ask HR professionals why there is such a disconnect, I think most would agree that although HR needs to prove its ROI, it is hampered by its inability to automate and track the effectiveness of its practices. Here’s the Catch-22. HR needs to update its technology but to do so it needs to prove its worth and to do this, you guessed it, HR requires the technology to automate reporting.

Currently, HR is using these measures to prove impact and value:

When the conversation turns to areas like talent succession and workforce management, it gets even harder with over two-thirds saying they find it difficult to measure their effectiveness.

Making it even more challenging for HR is the reality that only one in three operates with a significant demand to prove their value add and a quarter have little or no demand. Again, we have a situation where there are no metrics to demonstrate the quantifiable impact; therefore, it is hard to prove the worth of HR efforts resulting in systems not meeting employee expectations.

Consequences of failing to live up to expectation in HR

Apart from the frustration felt by HR, there is also the issue around talent. Again, everyone is aware that we are facing a skills crisis so companies that excel in their talent management will be those companies that rule in the war for talent. Employees are looking at employer brand and are willing to switch employers to brands synonymous with developing its people and powering their careers. It is imperative now that HR systems have the features and capabilities to nurture and grow and deliver the experience workers find outside of their jobs.

 

Jumeirah Hotels – where succeeding means success

Recently I came across this quote: “True succession planning takes time – it’s a process, not an event.”

Earlier in my career, I think I may have underestimated the full impact of this concept; but over time I have come to realise that not only is succession planning a process, but it is also a vital process that serves and benefits both employees and the organization equally. […]

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Recently I came across this quote: “True succession planning takes time – it’s a process, not an event.”

Earlier in my career, I think I may have underestimated the full impact of this concept; but over time I have come to realise that not only is succession planning a process, but it is also a vital process that serves and benefits both employees and the organization equally.

About a year ago the Jumeirah Group, a global luxury hotel and resort company with over 14,000 employees, decided it was time to design and implement a comprehensive and structured succession planning framework, and one that allowed us to incorporate performance reviews.

This was by no means a small undertaking, and the technology and the work involved from moving data from one system to another required training. In fact, it was only when my colleagues and I first sat down with SumTotal Systems to begin the discussion about how we would proceed, what our goals were and how we envisaged achieving these goals, that the enormity of the task dawned on me.

But fortunately, SumTotal was there to help me integrate the new system with all the old systems, provided training for new systems and technology, and even when it was all up and running continued to provide much-needed support, advice and reassurance through their support portal.

There were a few bumps naturally, but thanks to the simplicity of the design and the expert training, our completion rate of appraisals rocketed from 7% to 97%.

We also noticed that, due to the implementation of the succession planning process, we now could set in motion the steps to ensure any high potentials who were identified were suitably recognized and provided with additional support and opportunities to develop and thrive. In a way, having all this data about our employees has enabled us to establish a talent pipeline and consequently both employees and the organization reap the benefits.

We also went paperless, something I’m personally quite proud of, and despite the additions to our talent management system, it is now a lot easier to access and utilize.

Earlier this month Aon Hewitt, a leading global human resource consulting company named us a “Best Employer in the UAE,” and although I know there are many reasons we earned this accolade, I can’t help but feel that our new talent management processes played a part.

Muna Al Mazam is the Talent Manager of Learning & Development for the Jumeirah Group.

5 Things You Need to Know About Managing Talent Today

Even if you have never seen Fight Club you will no doubt be familiar with these now infamous and iconic lines:

The first rule of fight club is you do not talk about Fight Club. […]

Skillsoft_SocialBanner_800x450_CoWorkersOnLaptop

Even if you have never seen Fight Club you will no doubt be familiar with these now infamous and iconic lines:

The first rule of fight club is you do not talk about Fight Club.

The second rule of Fight Club is YOU DO NOT TALK ABOUT FIGHT CLUB.

Sometimes, I think HR can be a bit like that. Okay, so we do not pulverise each other, but it can feel like you are working in a vacuum, isolated both from the rest of your organization, but also, and importantly, from other people in HR. There is a myth that HR is something that happens behind closed doors and is only spoken about when a problem arises. Perhaps someone in finance has watched Fight Club one too many times, and then all of a sudden it’s all about HR.

But in the normal run of things, the day to day business of managing talent, this is what intrigues me.

What are your HR peers focusing on? How are other HR departments handling the ever evolving world of the modern worker whose expectations and experiences with HR is rapidly being reshaped by technology at a rate that is both thrilling and equal parts exhausting and infuriating?

Which is why when we do get some insights into the world of HR, we tend to inhale the information as though it was a last meal.

The Fosway Group and SumTotal’s Transforming Talent in the Modern Workforce research and Mercer’s Talent Trends 2017 Global Study have both recently completed large comprehensive studies on the modern workforce and what the findings reveal is that, not surprisingly, HR is feeling the heat of the modern worker and their collected expectations.

#1 Performance management and appraisals show the most progress

88% of company’s made changes to their performance management processes in 2016, with more to follow. However, only 44% reported that their performance management process was ready for the modern work force, which means most do not feel ready.

#2 Learning & Development is not ready for the impact of technology

Again, only 42% believe they are ready to provide ‘very advanced’ learning. What does this mean for L&D professionals, and how can HR address this poor showing?

#3 Career development is not developed

Only 1 in 10 said their approach is very advanced, with 69% saying they have work to do to be ‘ready.’ I am slightly surprised by just how low this number is, and do have to wonder why it is so abysmal? Are we not listening to our talent, who repeatedly express a desire to have the opportunity to advance in their careers and see it as a deciding factor when choosing an employer?

#4 Not promoting from within

Harnessing talent internally is still one of the least advanced elements of the talent agenda. Again, I am disappointed that companies are not seeing the incredible opportunity that is at their disposal, particularly since we all know there is a massive skills shortage and soon we will see companies fighting over talent.

#5 Hiring is misfiring

Less than 1 in 4 believe their talent pool approach is ‘ready.’ Without sounding like I am on repeat, this too is a figure that is less than satisfactory. What are we not doing that we should be doing?

Are you surprised by the results? Or are you nodding your head in agreement?

What would you say are the roadblocks facing HR? Well, if your answer includes any of the following – company culture, lack of organizational urgency around talent management and time constraints- you’d be right. When asked, these were the items that popped up the most.

But I’m curious now to see and hear what HR is doing to combat these concerns and improve the numbers. I’m also encouraged by customers I have the privilege of speaking with who are taking steps to right some of these wrongs.

Perhaps now that such areas of concern have been highlighted, we might see a greater redirection of focus or efforts. But we still need greater buy-in from CEOs and others who can impact company culture and shift the emphasis to greater awareness around managing talent today.

If HR is to win and succeed in managing a workforce that is itself evolving and facing new challenges, we must have more open discourse. Otherwise, much like Fight Club’s protagonist, HR will become embroiled in a war with itself.

What is the Future of HR and Talent Management?

HR must give value or give notice” – Dave Ulrich

Okay, so we’ve been hearing this statement for some time now. This, and the fact that HR is facing change like never before: politically, economically, and socially. […]

SumTotal_800x400_blog_Predictions2

HR must give value or give notice” – Dave Ulrich

Okay, so we’ve been hearing this statement for some time now. This, and the fact that HR is facing change like never before: politically, economically, and socially.

But what does it all mean to the person working in HR?

When they go into the office and open their email, what fills those subject lines? What issues or problems do they encounter on a daily basis?

This is what we wanted to know, so we asked. We surveyed HR teams from a broad range of industries, company sizes, and included those from both the public and private sectors. In total, we got 175 responses reflecting the thoughts and opinions of 150 organizations.

We took the responses and developed a white paper, The Future of HR and Talent Management.

Will the results surprise you? Perhaps.

Is it a worthwhile read? Definitely.

The survey provides some fascinating insights – including the reasons for the current penchant for switching jobs regularly, why the traditional bi-annual review is going the way of the dinosaurs, and what it means for everyone – not just HR – that only 10% of respondents rated their onboarding process as effective.

What is the benefit, the value of this information?

I think one of those interviewed, Fran Stott, HR Director with Story Homes provides the answer:

“I think the HR function needs to be able to show their value to the business, and strategically support the business in their medium to long-term ambitions.”

In other words, HR must give value. And to be of value, you must have knowledge, understanding, and a comprehensive and current picture of the situation, in this case the workplace environment, to then be in the best position to serve and provide, yes value.

To get this, I’d recommend you start by reading the white paper, here.

How to handle a large, dispersed workforce and ever changing government pay regulations

Change is good, but let’s face it, change brings disruption. And when it is government rules and regulations that are changing, such disruption can significantly impact HR operations. [...]

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Change is good, but let’s face it, change brings disruption.

And when it is government rules and regulations that are changing, such disruption can significantly impact HR operations. Now on top of everything else, HR must figure out how best to handle this new development, while simultaneously continuing to provide all the other myriad of services without any glitches.

Now imagine that the change encompasses not only how you report the annual income of all employees, but also impacts retirement pensions. And for a staff that already presents challenges given their dispersion across multiple departments, each with their own separate processes and systems.

This is the rather unenviable position we at Gwynedd Council found ourselves in. We needed to figure out a way to incorporate all these new regulations, yet with a process that was also agile and could, in time, adapt should any further changes occur.

To solve this dilemma, we turned to SumTotal’s configurable payroll solution which allowed us to streamline data and bring together multiple payments in an efficient and less time-consuming manner. What further helped is that the new solution also facilitates greater opportunities for reporting analysis, which was hugely relevant given the new regulations around Real Time Information (RTI).

To streamline the process even more, we integrated auto-enrollment in the workforce pension into the system, which made us compliant with all the new changes, without, and this was important, additional workload.

In short, now we are not only in compliance with all the new government regulations, we have eliminated paperwork and labour intensive procedures for processing payments, can now give payroll managers a comprehensive overview of their entire staff for better budget planning and finally, and significantly, can strategically plan for future changes in government rules and regulations.

To read the Gwynedd Council case study, click here.

Join Us at the 2017 India Perspectives

Stepping into the Future of Learning and Talent is the theme of our 2017 Perspectives conference this year.

What does that mean and why did we choose it?

Arguably, it could mean many things. […]

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Stepping into the Future of Learning and Talent is the theme of our 2017 Perspectives conference this year.

What does that mean and why did we choose it?

Arguably, it could mean many things. But for us, as the leading provider of eLearning, we feel it is our duty to ensure our customers are prepared. Now while we can’t prepare you for absolutely everything, we can prepare you for the future workplace, the future worker, the future learner.

Let me assure you that the future looks different. Change is happening on every front: from consumer-led content and personalised technology, to gamification, virtual reality, and the arrival of Gen Z.

It is a future that will present people working in L&D and talent management with challenges, but challenges that can be easily met – if you’re prepared.

To ensure you are prepared, we’ve put together an agenda that encompasses all these areas and is filled with expert thought and insight into not only what to expect, but how to meet these expectations.

For starters, our Executive Chairman, Bill Donoghue, will give an overview of the changes we have made to our content, systems, and platforms over the past 12 months and how we plan to continue this growth in the future.

He will be followed by Apratim Purakayastha (AP), our CTO, who will discuss in greater detail our technology. Potoula Chresomales, SVP Product, will unveil Percipio, our new and exciting learning experience, while Bill Docherty, SVP Product, will talk everyone through the new SumTotal Future Roadmap.

Then, we will have a panel discussion moderated by Melissa Ries, VP & GM, APAC on Is Your Talent Future Ready and include Damodar Padhi, VP & Global Head – L&D, TCS, and Prithvi Shergill, ex-CHRO, HCL.

Lastly, from Skillsoft I’ll give you quick overview on all the fabulous new content we have completed and what else will soon be making its way to your systems.

Next, we’ll turn the day over to three of our customers – Tata Communications, Landmark Group, and Sun Pharma to show case their success stories.

Ester Martinez, Editor-in-Chief of People Matters will then host a lively and energetic debate on looking at the organizational learning with two lenses – HR and Business. This will be followed by the Keynote Address by Ashish Vidyarthi, National Award Winning Actor, Speaker, and Founder of AVID MINER.

To end, we will announce the winners of our 2017 India Innovation Awards.

We look forward to see you at 2017 India Perspectives on Thursday, May 18 at The Oberoi Mumbai.